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Alcohol Advice

 

For many people, having a drink with friends is one of life’s pleasures. However, for others, drinking can lead to a variety of problems.

This could be because they drink too much, or maybe that they drink too often. Or it could be that they drink too much in settings that put them at risk of harming themselves or people around them.

For Self-Help information please vist the Know Alcohol Trafford Website http://www.trafford.knowalcohol.co.uk/Default.aspx 

What is one unit of alcohol?

So, how can someone decide if someone is drinking too much too often? Firstly, you need to work out how many units they usually drink. Different types of drinks contain different strengths of alcohol, so some will have more units than others.

You could calculate the amount of alcohol in any drink, if you know the quantity of liquid and the percentage of alcohol it contains.

We know you are not likely to remember a formula when you are having a drink, so we have given you a guide to the number of units contained in some popular drinks – see the table below.

The amount of units in a drink is calculated from the formula,

 

Equation

A guide to the number of units in some popular drinks:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The amount of units in a drink is calculated from the formula,

Pint or can of normal - strength lager (Harp, Carling, Boddingtons etc.) = 2 units

Pint or can of strong lager (Stella, Red Stripe, Corona, Kronenbourg etc.) = 3 units
Bottle of lager (Budweiser, etc.) = 2 units
1 litre bottle of normal - strength cider (Strongbow, Woodpecker etc.) = 4.5 units
1 500ml can of super - strength lager = 4.5 units
1 litre bottle of strong cider (White Lightning etc.) = 8 units
1 bottle of alcopop ( Bacardi Breezer, WKD, Smirnoff Ice etc) =2 units
75cl bottle of sherry (QC, Harveys Bristol Cream) = 26 units
75cl bottle of port = 15 units
75cl bottle of wine (wine comes in different strengths, so check the label) =7-9 units
Large glass of wine in a pub = 3 units
Standard-sized bottle of spirits (vodka, gin, brandy, whisky etc.) = 26–28 units
1 litre bottle of spirits (vodka, gin, brandy, whisky etc.) = 40 units
A single pub measure of spirits (vodka, gin, brandy, whisky etc.) = 1 units

How many units should I be drinking?

To help decide if someone is drinking too much, work out how many units they drink in an average week and compare this amount with the safe limits set out below.

For men, the recommended safe limits for drinking are no more than 3–4 units a day. That means no more than 21 units per week.

For women, the recommended safe limits for drinking are no more than 2–3 units a day. That means no more than 14 units per week.

Anyone who drinks should have at least two alcohol-free days every week.

The Government's advice says pregnant women should avoid drinking alcohol. If you choose to drink, to minimise risk to the baby, you should not drink more than one to two units of alcohol once or twice a week and you should not get drunk.
There are times when you will be at risk after drinking alcohol, so always avoid drinking alcohol if planning to drive, exercise or operate machinery.
It takes around 12 hours for alcohol to leave your bloodstream after drinking four pints of continental lager or ale. This means that you will still be over the alcohol limit to drive, even if you have had a night's sleep
.

 

 

 See below useful links for help and support with Alcohol problems:
 

Advice for young people under 18
Useful links to local and national organisations providing support and advice to people under 18.

Advice for people aged 18-25
Based in Sale, our 18-25 service provides tailored support to those who may not be ready for the adult service. The service is free and confidential.

Advice for Adults
Useful links to local and national organisations providing support and advice to adults.

Advice if you are concerned for someone
Links to local organisations who can provide support and advice if you are concerned about the welfare of a friend or relative.

 



 
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